ASCII Art

ASCII Art Gallery. com is down and does not seem likely to return. Source: ASCII Art - ASCII Picture - AsciiArtGallery, The Showcase of Computer Keystroke ASCII Art
There were more posted but I especially liked these two. Source: Floydworx
July 17 is ? World Emoji Day. Celebrate in style and give emoji the appreciation it deserves!
Source: ? World Emoji Day ? July 17, 2015
Kaomoji Emoticons
Kaomoji are probably what you think of when you think of Japanese emoticons. These are text based emoticons made out of a wide variety of different 2-byte characters. Kaomoji means "Facemark" in Japanese.
Emoji Emoticons
Emoji are small image emoticons that were invented in Japan for use with cellphones. The word Emoji means "Picture Letter" in Japanese. Emoji are built into a bunch of different cell phones and are standardized across devices.
Source: About JapaneseEmoticons.net I like having a real phrase for the text versus graphic image emoticons. I still think of emoticons as the basic keyboard text, ASCII style. I guess they could be known as ASCII emoticons.
Quoted from my answer on Quora:
I open Notepad (on a Windows PC) and start working on an idea. It's like a puzzle to fit the characters together in a way that creates an image. Some inspiration comes from searching for images or those I find. I look for clean lines so it will be easier to adjust when I need to figure out the spaces, characters, slopes for lines, and so on. The font you work with makes a difference. Notepad uses FixedSys (or one of the newer offshoots). I seldom like how ASCII art looks when it is shown in another font. Courier and others use a thinner line which makes the ASCII art seem washed out. Plus, even though they are monospaced, the lines in columns don't match up exactly the same. I know some people would make a pattern or sketch and tape it to their monitor. So the ASCII art would be like filling in the lines (connecting the dots). I've never done that. Most often I have a general idea and add some characters, sit back a bit and see how things are shaping up as I go along. Don't delete a bunch of stuff and start over too often. Sometimes just adding a bit of detail will pull the whole image together. Circles and curves are one of the hardest things to work with, especially if you make a smaller ASCII art image. Close lines, like trying to make fingers for a hand, are pretty much impossible unless you make a bigger image or settle for a hand with just three fingers. I avoid hands and just have people holding things. This works well cause it adds more details to the image and explains what it was meant to be. I don't use any alt characters. ASCII isn't about anything but the standard keyboard characters. You can do a lot with lines and dashes but I find a way to use numbers and letters too. It seems a bit bare without them.
via - What is the process of making ASCII art? - Quora.
I've been interested in keeping old content and what happens to content once the source is gone, for a long time. In particular, web content, since the days I was an editor with the Open Directory Project. I liked finding sites which disappeared. Often I could find them again, on their own domain or from their own domain to a free service like Blogger. I liked tracking them down. It was an adventure and something I could feel pleased about. Not every site could be found again. Often, they were abandoned too. Content still there but no one maintaining it. There are so many other issues when it comes to preserving online/ web content. Consider the web host the site is on. When payments to the host stop it isn't long before the domain expires and the site will go missing. What happens to your own sites, social media and whatever else you've got, if you die? I think about that too. Mine would all just be gone and not all that missed. But, I've written it mostly for myself and my own satisfaction, something new to learn. I've got archives of ASCII art. Loads of it but all a mess, not organized. I try to sort it but soon decide my methods are not working well and no one will actually find anything. Plus, there is the problem of how to display it. ASCII art works in plain text files but does not show up on an HTML site (very well or easily) that way. I've had people bitch, complaining that it isn't really ASCII art if it's shown in an image file versus plain text. Well, whine on, but you don't have the headache of trying to make it work. Anyway, so much for keeping on point... I'd like to know more about how web content is being archived and what people are doing with the content they save. How is it being stored? Is it viewable by anyone? What about copyrights? So many questions...  via- The Association of Canadian Archivists
I'm a hobbyist at best when it comes to coding anything. But, I hope this post finds it's way to people who actually do know how to preserve this site and all the art upon it. See ASCII Arena for just a look around to to help out if you can.