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Which image shows the ASCII art better? One is a screen capture of ASCII art I posted as text to a blog. To display it as text rather than an image file (png, jpg or gif) I have to be satisfied with those lines running through it and the gaps too. I don't like it, but so far it's the best solution I have found to the problem of displaying text in an HTML world. I prefer using screen capture to display the ASCII art so it can show as I created it, in the text file. Likely this is getting confusing for anyone who has not had the problem of making ASCII art work to be shown on the Internet. I used to post ASCII art to HubPages and other online sites. I seldom do now because several people were leaving comments about the images being posted as an image file instead of as a text file (which they could grab with cut and paste - using without permission or assuming ASCII art is all free to take). Well, I had set it up to display as an image gallery, just like photos, paintings and so on. The artist does not bring paint cans to the gallery and try to recreate all his or her work for the display. I see the ASCII art the same way. Mainly, it is very difficult to get the ASCII art to display in plain text. Each site uses different software, HTML code and fonts. Every time I want to post ASCII art as text I would have to figure out how it will work on each individual site and sections on the site itself could be different. I did find some things which worked, sort of. For blogs I found a plugin which displays the text in the right format but, it leaves it choppy looking, with bare lines between. I don't like the look of it - but it is the best I have found so far.  I'm still using it on this blog and my other blogs if I post a few ASCII art pictures I find on the web. At this point I am done with trying to post text files anywhere online but in an actual text file which can be a clickable link from the HTML web page. Keep it simple. If people want to complain they can go ahead and do so. But, no one should complain without offering me a solution to the problem of posting text in an HTML environment. If you don't have a real solution, you should not complain about the solution I have found.
I still need to check these links but posting them meanwhile.
Alt.Ascii-Art FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) and their answers for the alt.ascii-art Usenet newsgroup. Compiler: CJRandall
Rowan Crawford's ASCII Art Guide
ASCII Graphical Techniques V.1
Normand Veilleux's ASCII Art Tutorial
ASCII Art tutorial from Normand Veilleux.
Make a Start in ASCII Art
Tutorial by Danie Au.
Targon's ASCII Art Tutorial
Targon's ASCII Art Tutorial
So, You Want to Make Text Art?
Tutorial by Jonathon R. Oglesbee (JRO).
Susie Oviatt's ASCII Art Tutorial
Susie Oviatt's ASCII Art Tutorial
Welcome to ASCII-Art
Answers to frequently asked questions in the ASCII art discussion groups. Author: Matthew Thomas.
ASCII ART FAQ by Jorn Barger
ASCII ART FAQ by Jorn Barger
Ye Olde Ascii Art FAQ ( Bob Allison )
Ye Olde Ascii Art FAQ ( Bob Allison )
How to Make ASCII
ASCII guide by Flump.
Allen Mullen's FAQ
Allen Mullen's FAQ
About ASCII Art
About ASCII Art - Graphical Images Composed of Text
Scarecrow's ASCII Art Reference
Scarecrow's ASCII Art Reference
Scarecrow's ASCII Art FAQ
Scarecrow's ASCII Art FAQ - Long Version
FAQ fromLocalColorArts.com
FAQ fromLocalColorArts.com
How to Display ASCII Art Properly
How to Display ASCII Art Properly
Legal ASCII Art Characters
Legal ASCII Art Characters
Joan Stark: How I Make These ASCII Pictures
ASCII Art Tutorial by Joan Stark/ Joan Spunk.
 
ASCII Art Canada Day
Not everyone tinkers with HTML any more. If you have and know what the alt image tags are (and where they are) you could give this a try. It's not so practical now that almost no one uses a text based web browser. In the early days of the Internet a text based browser was practical because there were few images and if you stuck with text only web surfing you could be much faster in the days of  dial up modems. As you can see below the code is basic HTML for adding an image with the addition of the alt attribute to describe the image. This alt tag is still practical for people who concern themselves with SEO. Mainly it is good for keeping your site accessible for those who are vision impaired and have technology which will read those image tags but be unable to describe the image unless the tag exists to be read. To do this, have your ASCII art ready. Create an ASCII image to go with the graphical image you are using. In your HTML code include the entire tag inside
...
tags, and put the ASCII art inside the ALT attribute.  (See the image below which I recreated and then cut and pasted from the site where I found this idea.)

With this code a text only web browser would pick up only the image text and thus show your ASCII art picture. The ASCII art picture would not benefit the vision impaired web reader/ browser. So it is a good idea to add a word to describe your image along with the ASCII art picture.

Do not add text before or after the image itself. It will work as part of the image. Keep it all between the quote marks and the PRE tags (which tell the web browser this is pre-formatted information which should be kept "as is" with line breaks and spaces).
Above you can see an example of chain letter (chain mail) which uses ASCII art to illustrate and attract attention to it. I've seen others which use ASCII art angels and a large face with open arms on either side. I'm not a fan of chain mail, even those which appear to be nice on the surface. How well meaning can they be when they are still based on telling people what they will or will not get if they do or do not send the chain letter to someone else. Often a lot of other people. Don't consider yourself expected to send this to anyone.
I haven't thought about ASCII art text images being used for passwords in a long time. I remembered the idea when I read a post written by hackers who were trying to create software which would crack ASCII art passwords based on repeated characters. ASCII art as a password is pretty unique still. Don't worry too much about hackers cracking your password. Just make your ASCII art a bit more complicated, using more variety in the characters you choose and include numbers and letters too.  Of course, the ASCII has to be one line too. Think of it as a good reason to work on creating new one line ASCII art.
Visual art made with words. Concrete poetry is a form of text art, like ASCII art and typewriter art. It's also poetry, the genre known as visual poetry. Concrete poetry uses words and drawings to illustrate a poem. The words are in the image. The text itself forms a visible picture on the page, like a silhouette. Calligram seems to be another word for concrete poetry. If there is a distinction between them I'm not sure what it is. Maybe calligrams are more about graphic art based visual poetry and concrete poetry is more text based. However they began the line between the two has become blurred. You know concrete poetry when you see it because the word has become the art, the illustration and the picture holds the words inside it. Sometimes the poem is written in a shape which can be read in different ways but still make sense. For example, a circle which can be read in any direction. Concrete poets use use typography: fonts, shape, texture, colour, and sometimes animation to form text art into prose.

Concrete Poetry/ Calligram History

Simmias of Rhodes, a 4th century scholar and poet, created poems written in shapes relevant to the subject. In the Middle Ages when Monks used concrete poetry to illuminate their written text. Guillaume Apollinaire (Picasso's friend) composed several calligrams.

How to Critique of Calligrams/ Concrete Poetry

Is it easy to identify the picture with the text? Is the image relevant to the poem? Does the image add something (humour, deeper meaning, comprehension) to the poem? Can the poem stand on it's own as just a poem? Does the text help form the image, does the text actually add something to the image? Are there alternative ways of reading the poem?

Try Creating your own Concrete Poem

Get a general idea of something you could write about. Pick a topic or idea which creates images and thoughts in your mind right away. Draw a sketch (like an outline) of the idea. Even if you want to work with ASCII art or typewriter art you sitll need a basic sketch to start with). Imagine yourself as a cartoonist who just has one panel, one image, to tell the story or explain the idea. Write your poem, get the words at the end of each line to rhyme. Keep it short and keep it simple for your first try visual poetry work. Aim for a total of four rhyming lines. Take your poem and fit it into your sketch. How do the words add to the sketch? Once you get this far you might change your mind about the sketch and draw it differently or start all over fresh, with a different vision for the image you use with your words. Go from there and turn your sketch into text art and then type in your words. This adds another challenge as you will have limits imposed by the typewriter or word processing text itself. A hand drawn concrete poem can be moved in any way your hand chooses to draw it. If you create ASCII art, you will (hopefully) enjoy the challenge of concrete poetry and ASCII art.

Concrete Poetry: Artists and Links