Blog

It's surprising that ANSI art isn't far more popular than it is. Instead, only a small group of old gamers, artists and musicians seem to know about it at all. Many people confuse ANSI art with ASCII art when they see it. ANSI art uses all of the keyboard characters including those you can't see on the computer keyboard itself. You can access these extra keyboard characters with the right extra codes and the alt keys. I don't make ANSI art myself. I like the puzzle of dealing with plain text. But I do admire all the colour of ANSI art. It used to aggravate me when people would post text art and claim it was ASCII art when anyone could plainly see there were all kinds of keyboard characters in there, above and beyond the limits of ASCII characters. Now, I've become a little more understanding and I see how there is confusion about ANSI art versus ASCII art. So let me make it clear. ANSI art uses everything you can get out of your keyboard. ASCII art only uses the standard keyboard characters - if you can't type it without hitting more than just the shift key, it is not ASCII art. I hope that helps to clear the whole ANSI/ ASCII thing up.

Get to Know ANSI Art

ANSI art is a computer art form that was used on BBSes (Bulletin Board Systems) in the 1980's. Like ASCII art, but it is constructed from a larger set of 256 letters, numbers, and symbols. ANSI art (extended ASCII) also contains special ANSI escape sequences that colour text with the 16 foreground and 8 background colours offered by ANSI.SYS. Some ANSI artists create animations, commonly referred to as ANSImations. ANSI art and text files which incorporate ANSI codes carry the .ANS file extension. ANSI art was used for games like MUDs (multi user dungeons), computer hackers, crackers and demoscene (which was about sound music, ANSI art, creativity and competition). ANSI artists released their finished artwork in files which they call packs. ANSI art is considerably more flexible than ASCII art. The particular character set it uses contains symbols intended for drawing, such as box-drawing, shading, mathematical symbols, card suits, characters used in languages other than standard English, and block characters that dither foreground and background colour. With clever use of the shading characters, ANSI artists could mix two colours and create more shades from them. The popularity of ANSI art encouraged the creation ANSI editors, some are still maintained today. The decline of BBSes and DOS made it difficult to view ANSI animations. So ANSI art has lost popularity and become retro, geeky or old fashioned and out dated.

Try Creating Your Own ANSI Art

ANSI art is pretty exceptional. Do you feel inspired to give it a try? There are still a few software programs which will help you create graphics/ images/ pictures with ANSI art. Explore the links I've added here, read the reviews and suggestions from the ANSI artists and then pick which ever software gives you the best tutorial on how to get started and where to go from there.

ANSI Art Links

Emoticons, are also known as smileys/ smilies. Emoticons are used to show or explain emotion in the context of your writing. They are a great way to use text, and show emotion, in an otherwise flat email. Emoticons can make communication clear when you are teasing versus being serious. I've also used them to make sure someone understands what I have written was not meant to be taken overly seriously when I am sending a message about something important. Making emoticons is as simple as typing on your keyboard. Look down there at your fingers, find the characters, press and release. Creating emoticons  is simple, once you know which emoticon means which emotion. Some emoticons, like the basic smile face, have developed several different versions over the years. Some have a nose and some are shortened to a two character smiley, no nose included. (The nose has become optional). ASCII Art - Scoop.it

Using Emoticons for Online Chat

Online chat uses text emoticons and turns them into image files/ graphics. Often people are not actually talking about making emoticons, but these graphics when they ask about how to make emoticons. Based on the original text emoticons these images are displayed as image files. Each chat (Yahoo, MSN, etc.) uses different emoticons and graphics. However, the basic smiley is still a smiley.

Sources for More Text-Based Emoticons

  :-) Smiley face :-( Frown face B-) Cool |-O Yawn :-D Laughing =D Laughing out loud :-/ Perplexed :-& Tongue tied :-J Tongue in cheek :-" Whistling :-O Eek :`( Crying face >-( Annoyed X-( Angry :-> Grin X-P Joking :-| Neutral :-* Kiss :-P Sticking out tongue ;-) Winking =) Happy face %-) Confused :-} Embarrassed 8-O Shocked %%- Good luck  

Rebus Puzzles, Wordies, Visual Puns, Pictogram Puzzles and Descriptive ASCII

I've seen this kind of insight puzzle several times over the years but if I knew the correct name for it I had forgotten. They are called Rebus Puzzles, also known as Wordies. In searching for more of these online I have found them called a variety of names: visual puns, pictogram puzzles and Descriptive ASCII. When people don't know the name, they come up with something themselves. I like 'visual pun' it makes sense. Some puzzles are straight forward text (like those I've added below). Others include pictures and symbols too. There's probably confusion about describing these styles and labeling them all with the same name. If you get brain strained and want a different kind of word game, try BookWorm.

Adding a New Element to ASCII Art

I like the idea of taking this a step farther as an ASCII art element. I've been working on ideas to create wordie puzzles (without pictures, just in text). They are a new element to add to text art. Kind of puzzling... So far I find I am only thinking along the lines of puzzles which include directional words like "above, over, under, beside". I think I can take the text puzzles farther once I wrap my mind around the idea of keeping them typed out rather than using graphic software which would let me move the words around the final image. Maybe no one will understand what I'm talking about there. But, I do and it's kind of a cool project for "someday".
_____________8__88_____8 ____________88_8__8_____8 ___________888_____88___88888 __________8888______88_8____88 _________8888_______88______8_8 _________8888_______88______8_8 _________8888_______8_______8 _________8888_____8_______8 __________88888____8______8 ___________8888888______8 __888_________88888_8 8888888________88_____ _8888888_______8_____ __888888_______88_____ ___88_____8_____8_____ ____8______8____8_____8_88 _______8888_8__88_8_88888 _____888888_8_88__8888888 ____8888888__88______88888 ____88888_____8_________888 ____88_________8__________8 _____8_________8_____ _______________8_____ ____________8_8_____ _____________88_8_____ ______________88_____ ______________8_____
I used to label all the Japanese ASCII art as ANSI art and just click on by. It was a snobby attitude, but I was trying to keep the standards of ASCII art - which is so often confused or cheated on with ANSI art and assorted other versions of text art which don't stick to the standard keyboard characters, no frills.Since my early days as an ASCII artist I have learned the Japanese ASCII art is not ANSI art, it really is in a category of it's own. But, there is an element of ANSI (using every and any keyboard character) thrown in.

SJIS is Japanese ASCII Art

Japanese ASCII art images are created from characters within the Shift JIS character set, intended for Japanese usage. So, Japanese ASCII art is usually called Shift JIS, abbreviated to SJIS or AA, meaning ASCII art. However, it's not typical/ standard ASCII art because it uses characters outside of those standard for ASCII text art. Shift JIS uses not only the ASCII character set, but also Japanese characters such as Kanji. Since there are thousands of Japanese characters, the images have more variety to them. However, they need to be viewed in the right font. Unlike traditional ASCII art (which works best with a monospaced font) Shift JIS art is designed around the proportional-width MS PGothic font supplied with Microsoft Windows. However, many characters used in Shift JIS art are the same width. This led to the development of the free Mona Font where each character is the same width as its counterpart in MS PGothic. SIJS art, like ANSI art and sometimes ASCII art, can be used to create animated text images using Adobe Flash files and animated GIFs. Shift_JIS has become popular and has even made its way into mainstream media and commercial advertising in Japan.

Sources for Japanese ASCII Art

The Mona Font

Mona Font is the  Japanese proportional font used to view Japanese text art.
 
Text art includes: ASCII art, ANSI art, typographic art, typewriter art, emoticons and Twitter art. They are all based on keyboard characters, more or less. Text art includes more than ASCII art. But, ASCII art will come up first and be the largest part of the search results when you look up text art online. The Text Mode blog on Tumblr has a mix of text art forms and techniques. It's worth looking through the current posts and the archives too. There's also a Pinterest account. On Flickr I found a Text group with all kinds of art involving text. Another group for Text as Art.

What is Text Art?

ASCII Art ASCII artists use the standard keyboard characters (if you have to use more than the shift key to type them they are not ASCII art characters) to create pictures (images/ graphics). This means artists who use more than the standard ASCII art characters are creating ANSI art. ANSI Art Artists have more flexibility with ANSI art because there are a variety of extended characters and colours which give far more options than ASCII art. It's funny how ASCII art is still hanging around and is better known than ANSI art. Typewriter Art Typewriter art is easy to understand. Take away the computer keyboard and put an old fashioned typewriter down in front of yourself instead. Use the typewriter ribbon to add more effects to the art you create. You can smudge the ink, for instance. You can also hold the paper as you type and move it where you want to type, exactly. This means you can type one character halfway over another - easily done with the old typewriter. Twitter Text Art Twitter text art is a version of ANSI art. But, like Japanese ASCII art, it is dependent on which computer, software and operating system you are using. Not all keyboards, systems and languages work alike. These differences bring variety to ASCII/ ANSI text art and this difference is also use for creating text art which works on Twitter. Emoticons/ Smileys Emoticons are another simple form of text art, easily explained. You may have seen them as smileys/ smilies. Text art created to show expression and mood in the flat communication of email and online forums and chats. :-) The basic emoticon, with the nose in the middle. Confused or don't see the face? Then tip your head to the left and use some imagination. Typographic Text Art Last of all are the typographic text art. These can have a variety of styles. But, they are all formed from text (assorted fonts) and created in a graphics program, like Gimp. Typographic art is the closest thing to being a cross over between ASCII/ ANSI art and typewriter art. If more artists got into this and really thought about how far it can be taken we would have some very creative and unique graphic arts text art.

ASCII Art

Typewriter Text Art