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Update: I've been added as a contributor to the project on GitHub. With a link to my site. I'm happy with that.  This is my original. The copy below is nicely decorated, in colour. But, there are no artist initials. I just went through and deleted all my art from Zazzle, all but closed up shop there, due to stolen art on the web. So much of it, without a link back to me,  without any credit for the original artist. People still assume any ASCII art is there for the taking. Wrong! This script created with my ASCII Art Christmas tree has been downloaded 179 times in the last month. It is a project on Github. I would think people working in open source would give credit to people who have done the work. In the past, I have given permission to people who wanted to use my art.  Mostly because they asked. No one has asked in a long time. They just take.
Thinking about this and that today. I used to belong to a modern spinster group online. Not sure what happened to it. But, I liked this slogan I found while looking for the old group today. "Spinster? I prefer hopeless romantic".
Source: Emoticon Dictionary - Gomotes I had not thought about fonts from other languages being used to create emoticons. This screen capture about Arabic emoticons was the only real information I could find on my first search. There must be more, but, chances are it won't be in English so it won't turn up in my search (using the English language).
Receipt Bot is an ASCII art photo booth that prints on receipt paper. Each bot comes with different coloured eyes – red, blue or green. You walk up to it and press the big button, and when you do, its eyes flash like crazy and it prints out your face, ASCII-fied on a receipt.
via My side project is an ASCII art photo booth | Web design | Creative Bloq.
Though Stacey may have well produced more typewriter art before her famous butterfly, none of it is preserved and the anonymous plate from the 1893 manual is now considered the first recorded example of “art-typing.” Though early typewriter art made its mark, the golden age of the discipline was still decades away — it wasn’t until the concrete poetry movement of the 1950s–1970s, best described as concerned with “poetry that appeals to the eye and not the ear,” that the typewriter became a commonly embraced artistic medium.
Source: A Visual History of Typewriter Art from 1893 to Today – Brain Pickings