ASCII Art Christmas Tree Lights Up

Update: I’ve been added as a contributor to the project on GitHub. With a link to my site. I’m happy with that. 

This is my original.

The copy below is nicely decorated, in colour. But, there are no artist initials.

I just went through and deleted all my art from Zazzle, all but closed up shop there, due to stolen art on the web. So much of it, without a link back to me,  without any credit for the original artist. People still assume any ASCII art is there for the taking. Wrong!

This script created with my ASCII Art Christmas tree has been downloaded 179 times in the last month. It is a project on Github. I would think people working in open source would give credit to people who have done the work.

In the past, I have given permission to people who wanted to use my art.  Mostly because they asked. No one has asked in a long time. They just take.

An ASCII Art Photo Booth

Receipt Bot is an ASCII art photo booth that prints on receipt paper. Each bot comes with different coloured eyes – red, blue or green. You walk up to it and press the big button, and when you do, its eyes flash like crazy and it prints out your face, ASCII-fied on a receipt.

via My side project is an ASCII art photo booth | Web design | Creative Bloq.

The Ancestors of ASCII Art

I especially like the idea that these styles of art, ASCII art, typewriter art, teletext and others, keep coming, without influence one from the other even. Just something people get an idea to make when they site down at the machine.

Though it is still around today, ASCII art reached the zenith of its popularity before the web. It was the visual language of BBSs, Telnet, and many other pre-WWW networks. In a wholly text-based world, these works proliferated. For the brief moment that modems were the preferred mode of access to other computers, they were useful. And their sketchy aesthetic seemed right for mediums that were provisional and changing rapidly.

These things did not evolve one from the other, so much spontaneously regenerate down through the years, time and again.

Source: The Lost Ancestors of ASCII Art – The Atlantic