On the Origin of Emoji

Lucas provides a brief history of emoji’s predecessors, all the way from ornamental characters in the hand-executed typesetting of early-16th-century printed books to the many symbols of digital type. His journey touches upon the evolution of the dingbat and the emergence of emoticons, the punctuation-based kaomoji, ASCII art, and even expressive punctuation such as the ironieteken — conceived to denote ironic statements — and late 16th-century English printer Henry Denham’s proposed percontation point — to mark rhetorical questions.

Source: On the Origin of Emoji

Input: Fonts for Code

Input is a typeface for code, designed by David Jonathan Ross and released by Font Bureau.

Source: Input: Fonts for Code

Why do we use fonts not designed for readers? Fancy fonts are nice for creating images with text or using as titles and headers. Think about the fonts book publishers have been using for generations of books and people.

It seems a better reading font is required.

Mashable: Why your Email Font is Ruining your Life

Fast Co: There’s Finally a Modern Typeface for Programmers

I’m hoping this brings back the ASCII art fonts, or better versions of them. My favourite is still FixedSys partly because I know how it will work and partly because it shows up bold rather than thin and faded.

Litographs – Wear your Book in Text Art

Litographs: Pick your book, choose colours and whether you want a tote bag, poster or other and you can have your favourite book (or the one you’re reading now) created as text art from the text of the book. I especially like the creativeness of the designs. Some really take the story of the book and show it very well in just one image.

link via – Book-themed lithos/tees with entire text of books – Boing Boing. I found the link in a post on Boing Boing. See above for the actual site link.