Radioteletype (RTTY) Art

RTTY – Radioteletype

Before the racy photos of characters made for the Commodore 64, before the signature of Fidonet and newsgroups ASCII-art was a limited phenomenon to which he belonged to an elite technicians who used the teletype with similar methods. The so-called RTTY-art is returned to the enjoyment enlarged by some enthusiasts who are making it available again testing period. These include Don Royer, responsible for this site, which already in 1970 on RTTY Journal published a piece entitled ‘RTTY ART made easy’. One of the peculiarities of this technique is that it is exploited not only the properties of the characters to simulate the forms through their combination, but also the overprinting of the characters themselves obtainable by certain instructions, which guaranteed the shading of some parts. Explored between the pages is also a viewer for files RTTY written in java, which correctly reproduces the images in the archive, with the overprints and the right proportions.

Source: RTTY-art, the grandparents of ascii-art. | Neural

 

ASCII Art: Super Low Bandwidth

Copy of an orginal post by Heather Champ. This is reposted from ASCIIArtGallery.com which is no longer online.

For those online whose Internet experience precedes the World-Wide Web, a first brush with ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange–a 7-bit character code capable of representing 128 characters) art might have been a computer print-out on the perforated feed paper with a representation of George Washington, the Mona Lisa smiling her mysterious smile, or perhaps even the somewhat silly grin of Alfred E. Neuman.

For the most part ASCII art lives on in thousand of signature files, representing three-dimensional letters, animals, and recently a stick figure doing the Macarena. And while the rest of the world may snickger and grin at these overly large “business cards” attached to each and every e-mail, ASCII art is coming into its own on a variety of different Web sites.

Why allow those chubby graphics to clog up a users bandwidth. Pixels are not the only element that can be used to create images online. Granted, ASCII art will never replace GIFs, but it can offer a very stylized look and feel that might be an appropriate design solution for a specific project. On the other hand, given that ASCII is generated in HTML, it’s easy to play with the font color without going through the bother of making changes in Photoshop and then retransparentizing GIFs.

äda’web has just launched their 4.0 interface–“Why äda’web interface 4.0? Because things go better with ASCII, the original Web art, the other white meat . . . and it is still best viewed with Netscape 3.n.” It’s wonderfully refreshing. Be sure to find Elvis! It’s a very smart and refreshing take on information delivery.

How to ASCII
ASCII art will only work with monospace fonts. Monospace fonts (e.g., Courier) allow the same letter spacing for each letter. For example, an “i” will take up the same room as the fatter “o.” Proportional fonts allow for smaller letter spacing; an “i” will have enough space so that the text flows more freely without looking as “gap toothed” as the monospace fonts. An HTML document must be coded using the
< pre > </ pre >
tag to ensure that arrangement of the characters will display properly with monospace fonts.

Online ASCII Resources

ASCII World–“You give us 26 characters, we’ll give you the world”–has a great online Transformation section that enables a user to generate Figlets, or ASCII headers. Gifscii is a utility that turns GIFs and JPGs into ASCII art. Enter the URL of an image and ASCII World checks the URL, fetches the image, and then converts it to an ASCII version. The process can take a minute or two, which is longer than the almost instantaneous Figlet generator.
Sophomore Colin Cross created a Figlet Input Form that generates a very impressive variety of output “fonts” more than ASCII World. It’s great for headers!
ASCII Art: Figlet Factory, Title Maker, Banner Generator
Past installments of Design Diary

Braille Art

Braille art is like ASCII art for the visually impaired/ legally blind. My Grandmother was legally blind, never learned Braille. But, she would have enjoyed art she could figure out by touching rather than trying to find an angle where she could see something of it.

ASCII Art Avatars

I got the idea to make ASCII art avatars today. But, so far I’ve found it harder than expected. To give me room to add features I would need to make them bigger. I usually make small things. Here are two I made from my original ASCII girl avatar. (A nurse and a librarian or school teacher).

But, I couldn’t make any changes to her face, like adding eyeglasses. If she were horizontal the 8 would be great but… she isn’t. So back to the drawing board on the avatar idea.