Is ASCII Art Open Source?

Some people get peeved because I don’t offer my art in a plain text file. I don’t like having my ASCII ripped off, as it so often and easily is. So, for the past few years, I only post an image file (a .png screen capture from NotePad). It still gets ripped off because people like to assume any ASCII art is free, like free software in price and availability. One person even claimed, “no one owns ASCII art”.

I don’t want people to assume it is free. Not free in price. Not free in value and not freely available to be copied or taken. Each person is different in this way. I do not see my ASCII art as free software. I’m not that generous. Mostly, I don’t like feeling taken advantage of when someone else is using my art and it makes me angry when it is being sold, or given away in a product without any consideration to myself. Financial consideration yes, also at the very least, an artist credit. How stingy is someone who takes something offered to them, claims it as their own and sells it at a profit to themselves only?

I would rather ASCI art was open source (the image file which at least still has my artist initials rather than the text file so easily “edited”). Any image online is pretty much open source, whether the artist likes it or not. Watermarks can be removed with software or scissors.

If it were possible, I wouldn’t have ASCII Art as open source either. Respect the ASCII artist, any artist, don’t steal art! You may want to think it is all open source, the person who created the art probably does not see it that way.

ASCII Art Christmas Tree Lights Up

Update: I’ve been added as a contributor to the project on GitHub. With a link to my site. I’m happy with that. 

This is my original.

The copy below is nicely decorated, in colour. But, there are no artist initials.

I just went through and deleted all my art from Zazzle, all but closed up shop there, due to stolen art on the web. So much of it, without a link back to me,  without any credit for the original artist. People still assume any ASCII art is there for the taking. Wrong!

This script created with my ASCII Art Christmas tree has been downloaded 179 times in the last month. It is a project on Github. I would think people working in open source would give credit to people who have done the work.

In the past, I have given permission to people who wanted to use my art.  Mostly because they asked. No one has asked in a long time. They just take.

The Modern Spinster

Thinking about this and that today. I used to belong to a modern spinster group online. Not sure what happened to it. But, I liked this slogan I found while looking for the old group today.

“Spinster? I prefer hopeless romantic”.

A Different ASCII Calendar

This would make the job of the calendar itself much easier but, how useful is it? Maybe it doesn’t matter these days with most people having mobile phones. I do think this is the style I could work with to create an ASCII art calendar for each month. It’s an idea I’ve had on the back burner for awhile.

Source: Calendar 2012 on Behance

Input: Fonts for Code

Input is a typeface for code, designed by David Jonathan Ross and released by Font Bureau.

Source: Input: Fonts for Code

Why do we use fonts not designed for readers? Fancy fonts are nice for creating images with text or using as titles and headers. Think about the fonts book publishers have been using for generations of books and people.

It seems a better reading font is required.

Mashable: Why your Email Font is Ruining your Life

Fast Co: There’s Finally a Modern Typeface for Programmers

I’m hoping this brings back the ASCII art fonts, or better versions of them. My favourite is still FixedSys partly because I know how it will work and partly because it shows up bold rather than thin and faded.