Creative Emoticon Art

Emoticons leading to a dedicated signature. Using emoticons (text smileys) to create a character, Sigmund Freud, in this case.  A new way to use emoticons. This isn’t something they could do so well with emojis.

Using and combining typographic elements in a sketch evoking a famous portrait is a form of optical illusion, the one we called “smiley” born under the tight limits of the ASCII characters in the infancy years and games of personal computing, which lent to smile through the sense of misappropriation, often vertical to horizontal that it conveyed, (and characterized as an art form during a bygone era: the smiley today have become a very compact micro animated representation inserted throughout the text, with the development of computer science).

Via marcohana.com

Did Emojis Really Descend from Wingdings and not Emoticons?

I’ve assumed emojis came from emoticons, the ASCII text smileys. But, I’ve got a new theory now.

Did emojis really start as wingding/ webding fonts and evolve into their current versions, dragging along the yellow smiley along the way?

I don’t see how emojis have much in common with the emoticons. An emoji is far more an image than a smiley.

What do you think?

How Do you Make Emoticons and Text ASCII Smileys?

Emoticons, are also known as smileys/ smilies. Emoticons are used to show or explain emotion in the context of your writing. They are a great way to use text, and show emotion, in an otherwise flat email. Emoticons can make communication clear when you are teasing versus being serious. I’ve also used them to make sure someone understands what I have written was not meant to be taken overly seriously when I am sending a message about something important.

Making emoticons is as simple as typing on your keyboard. Look down there at your fingers, find the characters, press and release. Creating emoticons  is simple, once you know which emoticon means which emotion.

Some emoticons, like the basic smile face, have developed several different versions over the years. Some have a nose and some are shortened to a two character smiley, no nose included. (The nose has become optional).

ASCII Art – Scoop.it

Using Emoticons for Online Chat

Online chat uses text emoticons and turns them into image files/ graphics. Often people are not actually talking about making emoticons, but these graphics when they ask about how to make emoticons.

Based on the original text emoticons these images are displayed as image files. Each chat (Yahoo, MSN, etc.) uses different emoticons and graphics. However, the basic smiley is still a smiley.

Sources for More Text-Based Emoticons

 

🙂 Smiley face

🙁 Frown face

B-) Cool

|-O Yawn

😀 Laughing

=D Laughing out loud

:-/ Perplexed

:-& Tongue tied

:-J Tongue in cheek

:-” Whistling

:-O Eek

:`( Crying face

>-( Annoyed

X-( Angry

:-> Grin

X-P Joking

😐 Neutral

:-* Kiss

😛 Sticking out tongue

😉 Winking

=) Happy face

%-) Confused

:-} Embarrassed

😯 Shocked

%%- Good luck

 

How to Stop Emoticon Addiction

ASCII computersAn emoticon is a terrible thing to waste.

Emoticons (aka smileys) are fun, easy and add a lightness to any email or forum posts. When you want to add emotion, feelings or mood to your typed words you can just slip in an emoticon. 🙂 They’re so simple to make, to remember and no-fuss.

Of course, some times we use a few too many. Sometimes we forget we aren’t typing a personal email and send an emoticon to the wrong person. Sometimes we send emoticons to people who just don’t like cute little text smileys. Then, there are the times we look back at the email we just sent and notice how many of those smileys are in there.

Too much of a good thing is still too much of a good thing. If you find yourself overindulging in emoticons – start cutting back.

Are you an Emoticon Use Abuser?

Not sure how many emoticons are too many? Ask the people you send your email to. Ask the people who read your posts on forums. (If you use an emoticon with every sentence you type – that’s really too much).

You find you also type a lot of other Internet shorthand, like LOL and ROFL.

Consider why you use so many smileys. Do you really need to explain or emphasize everything you write? Chances are the smileys have become a habit and you’ve forgotten how much simpler and uncluttered your text could be without them.

How to Control your Emoticon/ Smiley Addiction

Stop using smileys in emails or forums where you don’t know everyone well. Friends are more likely to enjoy the more personal styled communication.

Skip the smiley and actually write about your feelings and thoughts. Don’t leave people guessing or making assumptions. You may even find yourself connecting much better with people once you stop relying on smiley faces to tell them how you feel.

Instead of finding new and creative smileys to use, stick with just a few and use them sparingly. Standard emoticons like 🙂 😀 and 😛 should be plenty. Plus, these are standard enough for the average person to know rather than needing a special education on emoticons.

Replace the emoticons with something else. Go back to punctuation like exclamations points, question marks and dashes. But, don’t over use these either. One per sentence is enough.

Avoid emoticons and smileys when you have to write (or reply to) an email with any kind of bad news or a review of a person, product or service. You need to be professional at times like this and emoticons will not give that professional, competent impression of you.

One way to really stop yourself from over using emoticons is to remove them as a type of Internet shorthand. When you type a smiley follow it with a description in brackets. For instance 🙂 (smile face). This will slow you down and help you see just how often you really are using emoticons.