Text Art Used for Newspaper Advertisments

It seemed that many of the newspapers of the era carried such illustrations, with large titles and sometimes simple shapes like hearts and crosses all composed out of type. I know it as ASCII art, but it appeared roughly a hundred years before the personal computer even existed. Of course, before there were computers, there were typewriters, and the first recorded instances of typewriter art date back to at least 1893, but I’d never seen a record of any other ASCII-type art as early as the 1870s. I felt like an archaeologist who picks up an ancient clay urn and finds a modern emoji on it.

In the early days of computers, those first graphics were text inside terminals or printed by daisywheel printers. However, unlike other ASCII art, the designs in these newspapers were definitely not created on typewriters—but painstakingly composed one letter at a time with blocks of type by professional typesetters. Nor are they actually art per se, but stylistic tactics employed to exploit scarcity as an advantage.

For most of the 19th century, newspapers were slim things. Every page had to be typeset by hand, meaning that the largest daily newspapers stretched to only 8 or 12 pages—and many were even shorter. Advertisers soon figured out how to exploit this scarcity of space by buying more ads than they needed, perhaps to deny their competitors any room. But once they had all that real estate, what do they do with it?

An ingenious solution emerged: What if, instead of giant letters, you could build large letters out of smaller blocks of text? I haven’t yet figured out the exact point when and where this practice started, but I did learn that it predated even the 1870s. I found an 1860 ad for hoop skirts in the shape of a skirt. And in 1862, Smith & Brothers brewery in New York placed ads with ASCII text in several papers nationwide.

Source: Solving a Century-Old Typographical Mystery – The Atlantic

Nadine Faye James Seems to be Missing

I posted a link to her site and one of her images awhile ago. Today, when checking her site, I found it gone. So I went looking for her and, in particular, her typewriter art. I found some but, no trace of herself yet. Contemporary art disappears so quickly once the artist site is gone. All the other sources soon have current artists to promote. Nadine has a few styles and modes of art, typewriter portraits seem to be her biggest hit but they were done quickly, as people waited. I like her art which includes elaborated typewritten characters in a drawing or cut out snowflakes. A very mixed media artist. Someone described her work as analog, that sort of covers it.

I studied illustration at U.W.E Bristol and the Royal Collage of Art and graduated in 2001. Since then I have been working as an illustrator. My work is produced using pen and ink, photocopies, Omnicrom, letterpress, Letraset, typewriters and occasional screen print. I like to collect stationery, make books, draw animals, (especially dogs) and drink lots of tea while I’m working.

Quoted from Nadine Faye James.

The following sites wrote a profile about Nadine and her art, some of them also sell her art (still):

It’s Nice That

Illustrators

Letterology

Flow Magazine

Crust Station

Stereohype

ASCII Font Fights

Before I read the post I thought it was going to be about trying different fonts for ASCII art. I still like my version. I can imagine making the same one line text art using endless varieties of fonts and then picking the best from them. It would make an interesting project, maybe just a bit too time consuming.