Preserving History: ASCII Ribbon Campaign Homepage

THE SEMI-OFFICIAL, SEMI-SERIOUS
ASCII RIBBON CAMPAIGN
AGAINST GRATUITOUS GRAPHICS ON THE WEB!
I have noticed a disturbing trend in software of late, a trend exemplified in the Web. This is the tendency to decide that if you have enough cool looking graphics, you don’t have to have any real content. This trend, on the web at least, has resulted a glut of graphics heavy, worthless pages, that take a million years to download and once you have them, you wish you hadn’t wasted the time, and don’t even get me started on PC games!
WELL, I SAY NO MORE!
This is the ASCII ribbon campaign against gratuitous graphics on the internet! If you are interested in joining the crusade, put the following messsage on you page (or something like it, you get the idea):
– – – –
This page supports the ASCII ribbon campaign!
As a protest to the current trend towards all flash and no substance in modern software, this page will remain graphics free and concentrate only on content. Thank you.
– – – –
Since we don’t have a lot of graphics, and I can’t get a ribbon made out of text charicters to appear right on the page, this will have to do. Suggestions that we make a jpeg file of a ribbon made from ascii charicters were given the silent distain they deserved.
We ask that anyone supporting the campaign place minimal graphics, or none at all. however, I must reinforce that useful, intelligent use of graphics are okay, and are actually really cool. So, support the campaign, my fridends! We will prevail yet!
NEW DEVELOPMENTS:
It has come to the attention of the campaign that imbedded sound files and frames can seriosusly slow page load times. These things, less common when the campaign was started, are slowly becoming mre prevalent. While the campaign is not against them just yet, it does preach serious caution when implementing these features. Pass the word!

LIST OF SITES SUPPORING THE CAMPAIGN
Michael Sneeringer’s Movie Commentary
Mr. Quiet’s Library of Cool

via ASCII Ribbon Campaign Homepage.
This is not the original campaign but when I found the old link I thought it should be preserved too.

From the Original Respect ASCII Artists Campaign Page

Plain text version (below) for those who can’t see small print very well, like myself. The above screenshot comes from what’s left of the site on the Wayback Machine with the Internet Archive.

What is the “Respect ASCII Artists Campaign”? Well, it’s something that I decided to do not long after a few things happened that I didn’t agree with. When an ascii artist draws any art, that art is rightfully theirs. No other person has a right to claim the art. Most ascii artists will tag their art in some for or another. Such as…
Link With This Ribbon
Yeah! I got the SnowGlobe back up! LoL This SnowGlobe for instance, was made by Joan Stark. Her tag is the jgs. This is how people know that the ascii was drawn by her. When an artist colors it, for example how I colored it. The tag must always stay with that ascii art. Even if hidden within the color, the art is still tagged and people will know what artist drew it.
Not only does the respect go towards the ascii art. We can go a bit further with their popup files. Anything really, not belonging to you should not be changed without prior consent of that particular artist or creator. It’s just common sense and respect towards others.
Many people get confused about copyright laws and what they mean, I’ve included a few links below to let you know exactly what they are. They are important not only to the ASCII artists, but to any artist who creates. Such as…an artist who creates graphics for you to use on your websites. Give all artists the respect of a simple link back to their pages. All it takes is one or two lines of code. That’s all. Just like the tag on any ASCII art, link back to a graphic artist as well. They will thank you for it. If you don’t know who the graphic or ascii was made by….then kindly state that somewhere in the ascii art or on the website. If that artist sees it, they will be able to let you know. But in the mean time, just make sure that you give due credit.

Internet copyright Information
Intellectual Property Law Primer

Now… Hopefully, I have explain myself well enough for you to understand what point I am trying to make. It’s just important to give credit where the credit is due…just do the right thing. If you wish to support this cause, please download the ribbon to your own server and upload it with a link back to this page. Let’s let others know what this is all about. Thanks, and feel free to email me if you wish and I’ll put you on the list of supporters. Let’s do if for the artists as well as ourselves. We owe that to them.

Clip Art Guide Application for About.com

I’ve just applied for the Clip Art topic at About.com. It would be great to get in and start promoting clip art and getting more people making their own graphics and even drawing.

Here is what I sent for my application. If nothing else, I like to remember what I wrote. :

I tend to draw clip art rather than write about it. So this is not a previously published writing sample.

I never thought I could draw, though I wanted to and wished I could. Online I found ASCII art, text art created from the standard keyboard characters. Joan Stark became a famous ASCII artist in those days. She was one of my teachers as I learned how to make ASCII art in the newsgroups.

From my early ASCII art I became a sketcher and doodler. Drawing a rough draft from an idea so I could turn it into ASCII art later. At one point my husband said I was drawing and getting pretty good at it. Of course, I scoffed. These were just rough sketches, not any sign of skill on my part. But, they were recognizable and even I had to admit I was learning what was necessary to turn a pig into a dragon, etc. Which lines gave meaning to a drawing versus my traditional stick figure drawings.

I still draw stick figures. In my recent past I drew a stick figure cartoon for over a year in my personal blog. I also illustrate blogs with web comics for friends. I am still a casual illustrator and only web graphics, created/ formatted to be online. But, I have a real passion for drawing. It has developed from my early ASCII art and grown along with me.

They say ASCII art is dead now. I still see it, very retro looking but still alive. I’ve heard clip art is also dead. Photos are posted with blog entries, not graphics, clip art or illustrations. What a shame, a huge loss I think. The photos take away from the blog post as the two are not really connected. It is so much better to post a real illustration, something created for the topic written about. I wanted to start a campaign to change the policy of posting random photos with blog posts. But, friends talked me out of it. So far.

I really think this topic, Clip Art, is important for About.com to keep going and to expand into avatars, icons, bio and profile graphics, favicons, blog backgrounds, blog headers and illustrations for blog posts. I would like to work on this with About.com and show the people of the Internet clip art is not dead.

Clip art is growing, evolving and still creative and fun as well as functional. I’d like to encourage others who are so sure they can not draw. I’ve begun Doodle Week, twice, with different friends. The plan is to get more people drawing. After almost a year I got a bit worn down and retired the campaign. I started it again but just didn’t have enough readers as it was a new blog network I was working with. However, having the reach of the About.com network would help and I would be glad to run Doodle Week at About.com. I would like to get more people creating their own clip art for their own sites and profiles online. I promise I am not an Artist, just an artist with a passion for creating something that doesn’t look like a pig when I intended to draw a dragon.
Doodle Week (second time around) – http://www.ululating-undulating-ungulate.com/doodle-week/
Doodle Week (my first start at it) – http://stickfiguregrrl.blogspot.com/

Tricky to come up with experience. My clip art has just been for personal use. Here are some places where it appears. Almost all of it is hand drawn and then scanned into a file for the web. The ASCII art I create in Notepad and then use a screen capture (as the quickest and simplest method) to format them for use on the Internet. I’ve made web graphics but have never thought to keep or showcase them so I can’t really show them off to you now.

http://thatgrrl.ca/ldb/
– Need to be seen in FixedSys font. My HTML used to be enough but doesn’t work now. I have been putting off fixing these pages as they are mainly just for my own viewing.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/thatgrrl/sets/72157603381762801/
http://thatgrrlca.blogspot.com/search/label/Doodle%20Week
http://thatgrrlca.blogspot.com/search/label/drawing
http://www.ululating-undulating-ungulate.com/author/laura/
http://www.inherited-values.com/author/laura/

I wish I had something prestigious to show off my work. But, it’s been for friends and mainly a labour of love. I would like to have an egreeting card site for the stick figure grrls, they are kind of fun around holidays. (Grrls is not a typo).

I’d like to know if the clip art I create belongs solely to About.com once I post it here? Or, do I still have some ownership so I can post it on my own sites as well?